Presentations

Registered festival participants are welcome to attend an exciting series of presentations throughout the mornings of the festival. These presentations are led by invited clinicians, choral/singing leaders, and conductors of several festival choirs/singing groups. There is a diversity of presentation formats including workshops, demonstrations, and round table dialogues. Come along and share your experiences, ideas, and insights with presentation leaders and festival participants.

Schedule of Presentations, Workshops, and Collaborative Sessions

  • Nicholle Andrews

    Nou La (35min)

  • Nicholle Andrews

    Nou La (35min)

    A panel discussion between Nicholle Andrews, singers from Phoenix, Sydney Guilliaume, Fredereicka Petit-Homme and others to discuss the journey from the commission to the premiere on Nou La.

  • James F. Daugherty

    How to Use Inter-Singer Spacing to Enhance Group Sound and Vocal Efficiency in Collective Singing: A Practical Primer for Singers and Singing Leaders (35min)

  • James F. Daugherty

    James F. Daugherty How to Use Inter-Singer Spacing to Enhance Group Sound and Vocal Efficiency in Collective Singing: A Practical Primer for Singers and Singing Leaders (35min)

    All collective singers, regardless of styles of group music-making, have in common larynges, ears, and human brains. Scientific research indicates how these organs can interact and coordinate differently depending on the spatial distance between and among singers in particular venues. This session explores various ways to use and experiment with inter-singer spacing as a practical, science-backed strategy for achieving your group’s best sound.

  • Stephanie Martin

    Blest Pair of Sirens: Poetry and music in collaborative creation (35min)

  • Stephanie Martin

    Stephanie Martin Blest Pair of Sirens: Poetry and music in collaborative creation (35min)

    Choral music is, in its very essence, collaborative. The collective creativity generated between singers and conductors, conductors and composers, composers and poets, is a collaborative chain connecting a work’s development, from conception to fruition. A composer’s relationship to poetic texts molds the creative process, shaping rhythm, melody, harmony, and the spirit and meaning of the work. This presentation examines a composer’s approach to pre-existing poetic texts, as well as the trials and triumphs of fashioning new words and music from scratch. Primary source material revealing creative relationships from the past can be a helpful source of inspiration. Archival gems from the Library and Archives Canada, as well as more recent and personal experiences will be shared in this presentation.

    Reflecting on the process of composing oratorios with newly written libretti for ‘Water: an environmental oratorio’, and ‘The Sun, the Wind and the Man with the Cloak’, this presentation attempts to observe the process somewhat objectively, taking into consideration practical performance constraints, time management, and expectations of socially responsible action in the Arts. Examining correspondence between composers and librettists piece together a perspective on both current and historical collaborations in Canadian music.

    What elements are required for sustainable relationships between creative people in our present-day communities? What has changed since the early 20th-century in Canadian collaborations, and what has stayed constant? This presentation addresses these questions and welcomes thoughts from the audience.

  • Sarah McDonald Moores

    Humans in Harmony: Exploring Relational Accountability in Choral Music to Inform Holistic Restorative Justice (75 min)

  • Sarah McDonald Moores

    Sarah McDonald Moores Humans in Harmony: Exploring Relational Accountability in Choral Music to Inform Holistic Restorative Justice (75 min)

    What can be discovered at the intersection of choral music and restorative justice? In this dynamic workshop, we will explore the inherent trust, mutual respect, and empathy found in collective singing to deepen our understanding of relational accountability.

    Collective singing offers a profound human experience. From the first breath to the final fermata, group singing is a shared journey where individual voices merge to create a resonance unattainable alone.This collective endeavor cultivates a sense of belonging and unity in a world where such feelings are often scarce.

    Similarly, this sense of belonging can be fostered through a holistic approach to restorative justice when we understand that it is more than a practice, it is a collaborative way of being. With roots in the criminal justice system, restorative justice is sometimes misinterpreted or misimplemented. When embraced holistically, restorative justice provides a lens through which we can nurture human connections and honor the inherent dignity of all.

    Together, we will explore the possibilities that arise when we combine a deep understanding of belonging and relational accountability within choral communities with the supportive and expectant ethos of a worldview grounded in holistic restorative justice.

  • Yu Hang Tan and Emily Sung

    Teaching Southeast Asian Music: Embracing a Collective Singing Tradition in the Choral Classroom (75 min)

  • Yu Hang Tan and Emily Sung

    Yu Hang Tan and Emily Sung Teaching Southeast Asian Music: Embracing a Collective Singing Tradition in the Choral Classroom (75 min)

    This workshop explores the vibrant sound world of Southeast Asian (SEA) collective singing, delving into teaching and performance techniques that honor its cultural and pedagogical intricacies. Participants will uncover the common musical characteristics of SEA music, including vocal timbre, rhythmic patterns, and melodic structures while discussing strategies for culturally sensitive teaching. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical and social contexts that shape SEA musical traditions. Additionally, the workshop will examine the role of the conductor or music teacher in interpreting and performing this genre of music, promoting cultural authenticity and respectful representation. Through interactive discussions and practical demonstrations, attendees will gain insights and pedagogical approaches to effectively teach and perform SEA choral music, fostering cultural understanding and appreciation in the process.

  • Diane Murray-Charrett

    Coming Back to Song – Women who return to group singing (35min)

  • Diane Murray-Charrett

    Diane Murray-Charrett Coming Back to Song – Women who return to group singing (35min)

    The Cantando Women’s Choir began as a small group of singing friends in a suburban community who gathered casually between 2018 & 2020 to sing together. In 2022, to ascertain if there was further community interest in the choir, a sole notice was placed in a Facebook group of local moms, which resulted in a dramatic growth in the choir. Many interested singers were returning to singing after years away. This session explores the emerging themes resulting from the answers women gave when asked about their reasons for joining the choir at this point in their lives, and at this point in time. Highlights of conversations with the women, including some who will be present, as well as emerging themes from the discussions will be shared in this session.

  • Bruce Kotowich

    (Revisiting the) Flipped Rehearsal – Bringing Flexibility to the Rehearsal Process (75min)

  • Bruce Kotowich

    Bruce Kotowich (Revisiting the) Flipped Rehearsal – Bringing Flexibility to the Rehearsal Process (75min)

    Since the first use of the term, Flipped Classroom in articles in the New York Times and the Chronicle of Higher Education (2012), educators have been challenged to present materials in new, meaningful methods. This has become more evident since the COVID-19 Pandemic and has given us the opportunity to re-examine choral music pedagogy and recognize individuals’ learning behaviours. In Flipping the Rehearsal – Bringing Flexibility to the Rehearsal Process, we examine how introducing varied methods of information sharing can be added to traditional choral techniques. We agree that choristers must prepare music for performance in rehearsals, but many times we become limited by focusing on music survival ideas of learning notes, rhythms, and text. By setting broadened outlooks to include style and musicality in the primary music learning stages we provide the chorister a deeper rehearsal experience and enrich their ownership of the score. In this demonstration presentation, we will discuss application of a flipped classroom and experiential learning ideas to formulate rehearsal techniques and strategies that encourages the chorister to develop musical awareness of the style and sensitivity to the composers’ intention through individual and group activities. Participants will have the opportunity to participate through sharing ideas, developing strategies, and leading the group in singing activities to reinforce the responsibilities of becoming an active chorister through full, active participation in the ensemble.

  • Catherine Robbins

    Honouring Gratitude: Examining the nature of choral publications related to oral traditions (75min)

  • Catherine Robbins

    Catherine Robbins Honouring Gratitude: Examining the nature of choral publications related to oral traditions (75min)

    Gratitude is a song dedicated to reconciliation and healing. It is one example of the many meaningful Indigenous collaborations that have taken place in the Canadian choral world in recent years. This presentation shares the journey of developing a reconciliatory song project in relationship with Anishinaabe traditional drummer and singer, Cory Campbell, in Manitoba. More specifically, the presentation will focus on the revelatory process of coming to publish the song on a public website through video excerpts rather than producing a written score. This collaboration raised provocative and timely questions regarding the current practice of publishing choral scores from oral traditions and illuminated how current practices perpetuate and reinforce the White Possessive (Moreton-Robinson, 2015). The project pushed collaborators to question whether the voices of collaborators, arrangers, composers, and Knowledge Keepers writing from oral traditions are truly heard and credited in the publication process and whether current publication methods are in fact ethical in nature. How can choral publishing fully acknowledge the situatedness and relational nature of our collaborative projects? How does the nature of publication dictate rehearsal process? In the presentation, attendees will learn the song through this publication method, and engage in discussion that addresses the questions raised through the collaborative process. The presentation will expand on how publishing through an online video-excerpt method inspired subsequent outreach projects, influenced those who performed the piece through this publication process, and ideas for future projects from other cultural and oral traditions.

  • Brainerd Blyden-Taylor

    Brainerd Blyden-Taylor and The Nathaniel Dett Chorale: 25 Years of Afrocentric Choral Music Representation

  • Brainerd Blyden-Taylor

    Brainerd Blyden-Taylor

  • Mark Anthony Carpio

    SING PHILIPPINES

  • Mark Anthony Carpio

    Mark Anthony Carpio Sing Philippines

    The Philippine Madrigal Singers: 60 Years of transcending borders, inspiring audiences with their dedication to musical excellence. Step into the semicircle and experience how the Philippine Madrigal Singers continues to touch hearts and souls of those who come to their performances. The “Madz” is recognized as Artist for Peace by the UNESCO – bringing music that is transformational and socially relevant. More than just performances, the Madz continues to create various programs to nurture and develop future generations of conductors and choral singers all over the world.

  • Andrew Balfour, Hussein Janmohamed & André de Quadros

    Strengthening Community and Justice through Collective Singing

  • Andrew Balfour, Hussein Janmohamed & André de Quadros

    Andrew Balfour, Hussein Janmohamed & André de Quadros Strengthening Community and Justice through Collective Singing

    In this interactive and participatory session, the presenters will inspire participants to reframe their singing in the cause of justice through creating meaningful repertoire.

  • Andrew Balfour

    Interactive presentation

  • Andrew Balfour

    Andrew Balfour TBD

  • André de Quadros

    Song and Story Workshop

  • André de Quadros

    André de Quadros Song and Story:  Andre leads a creative workshop moving between songs and storytelling focusing on peaceful and joyful engagement

  • Hussein Janmohamed

    Collaborative creation as a struggle for togetherness

  • Hussein Janmohamed

    Hussein Janmohamed Collaborative creation as a struggle for togetherness

    Hussein leads an interactive group creation workshop focusing on Muslim music, sound, and ways of knowing.

  • Ryan McDonald

    Coming Home: Fostering Queer Identity in Choral Singing Spaces

  • Ryan McDonald

    Ryan McDonald Coming Home: Fostering Queer Identity in Choral Singing Spaces 

     

     Ryan McDonald, Countertenor

     


    Collaborative singing projects

    This series of 8 sessions provides unique spaces for groups/choirs to engage in experiences that celebrate and share singing traditions. 22 groups/choirs from Newfoundland and Labrador will engage with 22 national and international choirs/groups along with Individual Participant Singers. Led by international and local singing leaders, this project will explore a diverse and wide array of group singing experiences in exciting, engaging, and meaningful ways.

    The Collaborative Project’s 8 sessions will occur from 2:30 – 3:30pm over 4 days (June 29, 30, July 3, 4), and will take place in large, flexible spaces at the St. John’s Convention Centre. Each session will be facilitated by musical/cultural leaders – Hussein Janmohamed (Muslim singing traditions), André de Quadros (Indonesian), Andrew Balfour (Canadian Indigenous), Jean Hewson (NL folk/traditional), Scott Leithead (South African), Lisa Gillam (Mi’kmaq), Geraldine Ankra and Brainerd Blyden-Taylor (Afrocentric) Pat Abbott and Nadine Hebert (Acadien/Francophone).

    Some aspects of these Collaborative Singing Projects will result in further opportunities to perform together as part of the combined HarbourSING! event and/or in massed ensembles as part of the Gala Concert. There are so many fun ways to get involved: if you are a group of individuals who sing together and want to make music with other groups during the Festival, this opportunity is for you!

  • André de Quadros

    Body, Soul, Mind, Space

  • André de Quadros

    André de Quadros Body, Soul, Mind, Space

    Collective and improvisational singing based on the Empowering Song approach thatchallenges typical stage-based performance

     

  • Geraldine Ankra

    All hail King Jesus!

  • Geraldine Ankra

    Geraldine Ankra All hail King Jesus!

    Gospel collective singing traditions

  • Jean Hewson

    Sing around this one: Songs of this place

  • Jean Hewson

    Jean Hewson Sing around this one: Songs of this place

     

  • Andrew Balfour

  • Andrew Balfour

    Andrew Balfour

    TBD

  • Hussein Janmohamed

    Transcultural Collective Creation

  • Hussein Janmohamed

    Hussein Janmohamed Transcultural Collective Creation

    We will bring our musical cultures to make a new version of a song from Northwest India. Get ready to dance!

     

  • Patricia Abbott & Nadine Hebert

    Acadian and Québécois vocal treasures: A journey through song

  • Patricia Abbott & Nadine Hebert

    Patricia Abbott & Nadine Hebert Acadian and Québécois vocal treasures: A journey through song

     

  • Lisa Gillam

    Sipukewaq Ketapekiewinu’k – Voices of the River

  • Lisa Gillam

    Lisa Gillam Sipukewaq Ketapekiewinu’k – Voices of the River

    Miawpukek First Nation, NL, with special guest, Eastern Owl

  • Scott Leithead

    Sing together!

  • Scott Leithead

    Scott Leithead Sing together! 

    South African singing traditions

    • Registration

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    • Meet The Voices

      Meet the invited guest groups, participating groups, and collaborative singing project groups that will be performing at HarbourVOICES! 2024.

    • Venues

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    • Plan Your Visit

      St. John’s is the eastern gateway to North America – one of the oldest cities on the continent, the most easterly point in North America, and the capital city of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

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